Category Archives: Legends Of Jrp

The day I won Megan’s heart with an angry letter.

Previously on Legends of JRP:

Jason R. Peters: You’re very beautiful.

–September 4, 2003 (Jason’s 23rd birthday). First words to Megan Lecus. (I also claimed it was my fortieth birthday.)

JRP: Dibs.
Jake: Dammit!

–Early September, 2003

Brian: You should date Megan. You guys get along amazingly.

–Mid September, 2003; Megan’s boyfriend at the time.

Daniel: After you and Brian break up, you have to date Jason R. Peters. Promise me.
Megan: Sure. I promise.
Eric: After you break up with Jason, you should go out with me.
Daniel: Megan and Jason will never break up, though.

–Late September, 2003

Megan: I can’t go out with you.

–October 6, 2003 Read More →

The day Megan rejected me.

Monday, I told how I’d swore off dating and met Megan on my birthday; how my friend accused me of “trying too hard” and Megan herself forgot my name. Yesterday, I told how we discovered Megan was a gamer, and I called “dibs.”

Our story didn’t end there.

In fact, the story of our relationship properly begins with utter rejection and total humiliation.

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The day I called “dibs” on my future wife.

Many have asked how I got my wife to game. I don’t know how it is for others, but among my friends, there are only two kinds of couples: Mixed couples with one gamer…

…and BATTLE COUPLES, RAWR!

We’re a battle couple. We’ve played MMOs together. Platformers. Band games. Puzzle games. RPGs. Cards. Boards. Strategy. Despite our  introversion, our BATTLE COUPLE status is the envy of friends whose partner (for unfathomable reasons) does. Not. Game.

Worse, the Muggle determines all shared activities, insisting that the gamer watch tv during family time, but the Gamer can never ask the reverse (for the Muggle to join in gaming). It’s one-sided. Personally, I think both parties should make sacrifices.

Their stories are familiar and heartbreaking: The raid cut short because your partner was irritated. Leveling slower than your friends because the honey-do list (intentionally?) leaves no time for play. Audible nagging in Ventrilo’s background.

They all ask the same question: “How did you get your wife to game?”

Um…I didn’t.

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The day I met Megan.

Jason EngagementIn 2002, I lived in Harlaxton Manor in the United Kingdom. In 2003, I made my triumphant return to Stateside.

I’d made the Dean’s list. I was Gandalf at the costume ball. My fiction won applause at open mic night. My music won applause at the talent show. All the girls said they’d miss me.

I celebrated my homecoming by securing the worst job of my life, worse than my brief attempt in the military, worse than my year as Detention officer, worse than using cat litter to soak up liquid detergent.

I knew none of that. I had my first apartment, my first pager. My first private bathroom. From now on, my tuition was paid; no more loans. It would take me longer to finish school, but I was in no hurry. Life was good.

And I had determined never to date another woman for as long as I lived.

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The reason SWTOR is winning more affection than Neverwinter.

The Reason

I’ve had the privilege to partake a Neverwinter buffet this weekend. It’s more compelling than I’d assumed from character creation. Cryptic delivered across the board.

The level of polish that’s free-to-play is astounding compared to the landscapes of yesteryear. Voice acting is the norm for Neverwinter, bringing it into the new era of MMOs.

I’ve had faith in Cryptic since playing Champions Online, which remains the best superhero gameplay available (sorry DC) and full of concessions for roleplayers.

Cryptic’s interpretation of the Neverwinter franchise is similarly action-packed, an odd feel for a D&D game. It’s a daring decision that pays off: Reticulated targeting and timing-based attacks make Neverwinter a fusion of traditional sword-and-sorcery with physical combat. Facing and positioning matter.

Neverwinter is full of other pleasant surprises: an elegant interface (despite limited customization), convenient keybinds (we’ve finally learned that players use Q before 7), period-appropriate music and a breathtaking game world.

So why do I keep returning to Star Wars: The Old Republic?

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The day I became trapped in an alternate dimension.

13:01: Woke up in an Aperture facility; I should know, I’m a PLATINUM FOUR designer. I see those gray and white panels in my nightmares. Horrifically, I’m awake.

One of the alternate Caves must be running low on subjects. Unless there’s been another cascade resonance. God forbid.

I know how this works. I’ll have to navigate from room to room, solving puzzles and hoping to find a rift back to Earth Prime before I starve. Worse, some of the tests are deadly. Who knows how good the designers are in this dimension? There might be impossible tests.

As an Aperture Employee, it’s my duty to record my observations about the tests, so they can be recovered by AIs in the likely event of my death, and justice meted appropriately per Employee Handbook 17: GOOD DESIGNERS AREN’T TEST SUBJECTS.

The handbook must be different on this Earth, since obviously I’m a great designer and someone put me into the labyrinth. Read More →

The reason fame and wealth don’t matter.

The ReasonI use the WordPress Plugin “Counterize” to track statistics of the blog: What brings me traffic? Which posts are popular? Which links get clicked?

Most fascinating are the search terms that lead people here. Self-promotion goes to shared spheres: Writers, Bloggers, Techies, Gamers. Search traffic comes from anywhere; people who’ve never heard of me Google a topic and read what I had to say.

It’s as intimidating as it is gratifying.

Today, this search caught my eye:

what is important …fame or wealth

That’s brought two visitors here, 3.08% of my search traffic.

I haven’t blogged explicitly about either fame or wealth. But if people are going to search it and land here, however rarely, I’ll help:

Fame and wealth are not important.

What? Jason, your blog is called LEGENDS of JRP. Aren’t you chasing fame and wealth?

Not exactly. Writing is not lucrative. A convention panelist confessed that selling two books and six short stories inside a year (which is impressive) net him approximately…$10k. Not luxurious. Read More →