Tag Archives: Epic Fantasy

The day Brandon encountered a petty trap.

demonwall4-bOur cousins had a Super Nintendo before us, but it wasn’t Super Mario World or Smash TV that captured my imagination. Final Fantasy IV (FF2 in the U.S.) was my first exposure to JRPGs.

I feel in love. The graphics were so good you could see the character get into bed. (In full armor, but who cares?)

And the gameplay? Wow. The plot of an epic fantasy with combat strategy akin to tabletop. Incredible. Beyond platforming and racing.

There was just one problem, though, after I finally got the game:

As usual, I was grounded.

Since I wasn’t into sports or sleepovers, “grounding” meant I couldn’t play video games. Even if I had a brand new one.

Fortunately, I had an ally: My brother Brandon. We came to an arrangement: If I couldn’t play the game, I at least wanted to see it played. Brandon was happy to oblige.

Break out the popcorn.

Brandon forged into the new frontier with me beside him. We laughed together at the jokes, mocked spoony dialog, collectively gasped at twists of plot.

Many of the bosses were jokes…others, not so much. This One Boss, though, I’ll remember ’til the day I die. Read More →

SATURDAY SPOTLIGHT: Brandon Sanderson

Each Saturday, Jason spotlights one person, product, service, or work of art he finds particularly amazing; the kinds of things that make you wonder, “Why doesn’t everyone have this?” (Read more at www. jasonrpeters.com.)

If you read epic fantasy, chances are you’ve heard of Brandon Sanderson. If you’re one of the few that hasn’t, sit up and pay attention.

Sanderson gained instant notoriety with Robert Jordan’s fandom when he was chosen by Harriet Rigney (the late Robert Jordan’s wife) to write the final volumes of the Wheel of Time series.

Like many others, it was this news which brought Sanderson to my attention. And as crucial a step as this was in Sanderson’s developing career, true Sanderson fans might consider it a mere footnote.

The Wheel of Time

The Wheel of Time was an incredible read for about four books, after which it waded into perennial sequilitis. Jordan, having unraveled the Pattern at the rate of one or two Forsaken (The Wheel of Time’s major villains) per book, was unwilling to dive into the final chapters which would release all thirteen AND the dark lord they served, not to mention all the other forces of good and evil rattling around in Jordan’s brain.

The result was a long series of long books with phenomenal moments, but no end in sight. It was disappointing but not surprising when Robert Jordan passed away before the epic tale could be completed.

I give you this backdrop because though Sanderson was also a fan of Robert Jordan, in my estimation his work exceeds Jordan’s on many counts. Read More →