Tag Archives: Fame And Wealth

The reason fame and wealth don’t matter.

The ReasonI use the WordPress Plugin “Counterize” to track statistics of the blog: What brings me traffic? Which posts are popular? Which links get clicked?

Most fascinating are the search terms that lead people here. Self-promotion goes to shared spheres: Writers, Bloggers, Techies, Gamers. Search traffic comes from anywhere; people who’ve never heard of me Google a topic and read what I had to say.

It’s as intimidating as it is gratifying.

Today, this search caught my eye:

what is important …fame or wealth

That’s brought two visitors here, 3.08% of my search traffic.

I haven’t blogged explicitly about either fame or wealth. But if people are going to search it and land here, however rarely, I’ll help:

Fame and wealth are not important.

What? Jason, your blog is called LEGENDS of JRP. Aren’t you chasing fame and wealth?

Not exactly. Writing is not lucrative. A convention panelist confessed that selling two books and six short stories inside a year (which is impressive) net him approximately…$10k. Not luxurious. Read More →

Which is more important, fame or wealth?

zergrush

Gives a whole new meaning to "commuter".

A co-worker asked me this question after taking a long overdue glance over my blog.

I sincerely replied, “Neither, really.” And wondered aloud why he’d asked the question. He said because I make frequent mention of both.

Ahhh…

The honest truth is that in one real sense, I wouldn’t give a damn whether I ever made a dime from my writing, so long as I’m satisfied with my stories and so are my readers.

But all my readers so far are friends. Or friends of friends. Even when Megan’s coworker insists that Woman’s Best Friend freaked him out and scared him, I still know he would never have found my website if he didn’t know Megan personally.

The point here is that I can write the greatest story ever written, and even be reasonably sure that I’m that good. But I’ll always wonder and doubt, until the story is popular among total strangers.

Money and notoriety aren’t the name of the game. Becoming a good storyteller is the name of the game. But how do you measure how good of a storyteller you are?

…by fame and wealth.

That may seem crass, and it may seem shallow, and indeed, it certainly isn’t all there is. For instance, J.K. Rowling is plenty wealthy and famous, but while I find her work entertaining, I don’t really find it inspiring. And I’m sure there are many brilliant writers who are still in “starving artist” mode.

But it is a measure of personal success as a writer. And it’s the most visible one for others to recognize. It represents the dream that someday, my friend who called me an amateur writer (the same one who asked me this question) will get invited to my lake cabin to see what my “amateur” writings have bought me.

Also, it is very hard to make a consistent living solely as a novelist or short story writer. If I told you the hourly rate I’d make even if all my stories sold in first draft, you’d cringe. Just about the only way to be that comfortable as a fiction writer is to make it SO big, you have all the money (and therefore all the time) that you want.

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I took the above picture myself today in Chapel Hill. I guess that driver will be buying Starcraft 2. I look forward to stomping him. (After finishing a terrific story, of course.)