Tag Archives: Shame

CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO: Top Ten Reasons to Love Facebook

#10. Your closest friends aren’t on Facebook anyway.

My best friend from college is not on Facebook. My brother is not. My parents are not. And yet I have no problem keeping in touch with those people, sharing photographs or other content and making arrangements for visits. Even those who do have Facebook accounts, like my wife or coworkers, don’t use Facebook as a means to interact with me. In your real relationships, Facebook is entirely superfluous.

Your fake relationships are another matter.

#9.Finding friends who aren’t your friends (or them finding you).

You’ll get requests from people you barely met, or have never met. You won’t bond with them or develop a real friendship, but you’ll be able to peruse their favorite tv shows whenever you’re tired of watching yours. At the extreme end of the spectrum are those people you’d rather have nothing to do with who find you and friend you on Facebook.

“Facebook…an easier, more subtle way to be your stalker.” Read More →

Non-fiction Article Sold…Again?

soldLast night I received notice from www.helium.com that another the same article was purchased again by a third-party publisher.

Same circumstances as before; subcontracted for pennies-on-the-dollar of the going rate for freelance articles. We’re talking payment so cheap, the article has sold TWICE and I still don’t meet the “minimum withdrawl” amount at Helium.

So although my work has proven profitable, to Helium in actuality and to two publishers in theory, I haven’t yet made a dime from it.

Still, it’s a thrill to know my work strikes a chord with people. Just a shame that even my marginal successes (so far) come from non-fiction!

The really good news is that I still own the copyright, and as many publishers as desire can buy the same article again, furthermore I can also still submit it to magazines on my own. (Just not for First North American Rights.)

The other cool thing is that this reminded me of a fiction story idea built around the same frustrations I express in this non-fiction piece.