Tag Archives: Wheel Of Time

The day I ask what you’d like to know.

Question MarkI write many topics here on the blog; personal, professional. Reviews, gaming, roleplaying, game design, writing and more.

I know what brings my Google traffic: SWTOR, Wheel of Time, D&D and managing OCPD. I don’t know how much of that traffic returns to read other things, or how much my regular readers are interested in those topics.

To a large degree, it doesn’t matter what I write; the challenge is to make any topic both interesting and accessible to any visitor.

However, in the wake of personal stories leading up to our anniversary, I’m curious what you, my daily or weekly visitors (especially lurkers) find interesting. What were your favorite posts? What would you like to know more about?

I’m deliberately not attaching a poll or links to specific articles, leaving the question open-ended.

 

How to reread Wheel of Time before A MEMORY OF LIGHT.

This article is dedicated to Carey Peters, Bruce Lecus, and Ryan Jones.

So you’re a Wheel of Time fan. The final book, A MEMORY OF LIGHT, is finally finished. Praise the Light! Only it’s been years since you’ve read the Wheel of Time, which contains rich mythology, heavy foreshadowing, and loads and loads of characters. And most of the books are long. Will Continuity Lock-Out keep you from enjoying the final volume?

Don’t panic; there are a variety of ways to enjoy this epic tale before Tarmon Gai’don. And most of them don’t require rereading the entire series from pages 1 to 10,670, though that is certainly an option. Brandon Sanderson did so multiple times while writing the penultimate novels, so you’re in good company.

The idea of skipping books or chapters will strike some as odd; I assure you, it’s warranted. I’d rather you enjoy what you can than skip the whole series.

About NEW SPRING:

I was furious that Jordan wrote a prequel with the series unfinished, and (at the time) most releases failing to resolve much. I haven’t read NEW SPRING and don’t plan to. It is omitted from this guide.

Why your first reading was worthless:

The series is an order of magnitude better on subsequent readings. To modern readers, Jordan is dry, long-winded and fills his books with pointless chapters, especially later in the series. Only upon rereading (or reviewing supplemental material) does it become clear just how much Jordan planned in advance. Chapters which seemed at first irrelevant actually fill critical niches in the chronology.

For example, I used to hate any chapters with Whitecloak or Forsaken POV. They seemed to progress nothing. But both are rarer than I originally believed, they just seem longer when you want to read more about Mat. What you can’t tell in a single reading is how important a particular event becomes to the main characters  along arcs that take 8+ books to resolve.

Whatever you think of his prose, Jordan was a master planner; the foreshadowing and resolutions in Wheel of Time are second to none. On page 204 of the first book, Jordan tells you what Mat will do at the end of Book 13 to resolve a dangling thread from Book 5. Jordan’s work is photomosaic: Single chapters and books are downright ugly until you can see the larger picture. There’s too much to digest in one reading.

Your Prime Directive

I’m outline options to get you started, but the cardinal rule for rereading WOT is:

Don’t read what you don’t enjoy.

If you hated a book, chapter, or character, skip it. Even on your first read. I would rather you enjoyed the remainder. Remember Sturgeon’s Law:

90% of everything is crud.

…and the fan corellary:

The remaining 10% is worth dying for.

Read More →

Wheel of Time: The Beginning of the End of an Era

Brandon Sanderson posted this week that he has finished the final draft of A MEMORY OF LIGHT, the last book in the Wheel of Time series.

My own journey through Randland started when I was 16 years old, so I’ve been awaiting the conclusion literally half my life. I have followed Sanderson’s career and methodology much like he followed Jordan’s, so I owe a great deal to both men.

http://www.brandonsanderson.com/blog/1101/Today-I-got-up-and-I-did-not-have-a-Wheel-of-Time-book-to-work-on.

 

 

SATURDAY SPOTLIGHT: Brandon Sanderson

Each Saturday, Jason spotlights one person, product, service, or work of art he finds particularly amazing; the kinds of things that make you wonder, “Why doesn’t everyone have this?” (Read more at www. jasonrpeters.com.)

If you read epic fantasy, chances are you’ve heard of Brandon Sanderson. If you’re one of the few that hasn’t, sit up and pay attention.

Sanderson gained instant notoriety with Robert Jordan’s fandom when he was chosen by Harriet Rigney (the late Robert Jordan’s wife) to write the final volumes of the Wheel of Time series.

Like many others, it was this news which brought Sanderson to my attention. And as crucial a step as this was in Sanderson’s developing career, true Sanderson fans might consider it a mere footnote.

The Wheel of Time

The Wheel of Time was an incredible read for about four books, after which it waded into perennial sequilitis. Jordan, having unraveled the Pattern at the rate of one or two Forsaken (The Wheel of Time’s major villains) per book, was unwilling to dive into the final chapters which would release all thirteen AND the dark lord they served, not to mention all the other forces of good and evil rattling around in Jordan’s brain.

The result was a long series of long books with phenomenal moments, but no end in sight. It was disappointing but not surprising when Robert Jordan passed away before the epic tale could be completed.

I give you this backdrop because though Sanderson was also a fan of Robert Jordan, in my estimation his work exceeds Jordan’s on many counts. Read More →

“Wheel of Time” conclusion is being split into three books.

wheeloftimeThose of you who have been following along already know:

After Robert Jordan’s wife read the first Mistborn book, she was so impressed she asked Brandon Sanderson to finish the Wheel of Time series.

This initially meant completing just one book, A Memory of Light. However, as Brandon dug his nails into it for real and began to work 16 hour days, he found himself estimating that 400,000 words wouldn’t even nearly finish the book. He and Tor would much like to get Wheel of Time fans a book in 2009, and finishing the WHOLE story (now estimated to take about 800,000 words) will not be possible in that timeframe.

Solution? Split the book.

You can read Sanderson’s own notes on this project and this difficult decision here. I’ll warn you; I think he manages to ramble more in that article than I do, and that’s saying something. But if you’re a Wheel of Time fan, it’s all good stuff to know.

For those who are RJ fans and aren’t yet familiar with Sanderson’s work, be it known that I consider Sanderson the better author.

Soy un perdedor.

I have not done any significant writing recently. More the fool, I.

The article which the student who cited me quoted was “Should your faith influence your vote?”

The ideas for Fragile Gods are starting to congeal into more tangible forms.

Work (that is, my day job) is insane. There are myriad double-bookings this week, which means I have to be the bad guy and tell people to shape up even though I have no real power of enforcement over such idiocy. Then when the customers discover they’ve been double-booked, I get to take the fall. Lovely.

George R. R. Martin is better than I remembered. Why did I get bored in the middle of book two?

My father in law is not impressed or gripped by the opening of Elantris, which is one of the best fantasy books I’ve ever read, bar none. To each his own; your mileage may vary. (This is karmic revenge for the fact I have hated two of his very favorite fantasy series.)

Maybe Brandon Sanderson represents a generational shift. After all, my dad didn’t like Fight Club. (I know, right?)

IGMS (see sidebar on the right) has not yet rejected Woman’s Best Friend. Until I learn otherwise, I am choosing to interpret this as “no news is good news”. Perhaps my rejection letter is late because my manuscript made it from slush pile 1 into slush pile 2. One can only hope.

DnD Insider continues to disappoint, only this time with software they have actually “completed.” As previously stated, more on this in a future post. (Yeah, yeah, I know.)

Who are your favorite fictional characters, and why? Mine have included Hannibal Lector and the Joker from The Dark Knight. For outright heroes, I’d have to honestly say Rand from the Wheel of Time Series in spite of the fact so much else about the series is annoying. Batman in Batman Begins, obviously. Commander Adam from Battlestar Galactica is rapidly becoming a favorite, and I always enjoy scenes with Matt from Heroes. Hiro Nakamura deserves honorable mention here.

When you keep me honest about posting, I’ll keep posting. When the questions and feedback slow or stop, the posting slows or stops. You, my readers, have more power than is reasonable. Especially for those of you I don’t know that well.

I wonder if film composition would have been an easier secondary career than writer.